How is Google affecting our Heart?

Today is World Heart Day! Today is about educating society on how to be healthy in order to live longer; whether it is keeping fit, eating the right foods or timely sleep patterns.

However, with the rise of DR Google users – today is also a reminder to stress less. We are constantly connected to our mobiles, laptops or tablets. We are constantly on the move, whilst simultaneously connected to our work, our schooling or our family via mobile technologies. Every day stresses are on the rise with the consistent need to have a healthy work-life-friend-family balance. We urge ourselves to fit as much as we can into every day of our lives, without taking note on how it is affecting our health.

All these social pressures are contributing to the recent increase in DR Google users! People find excuses to not visit a real doctor (whether it is due to work, sport, family, education or friend commitments). Instead they visit DR Google.

Starcevic & Berle suggest people these days seek medical information online as it’s faster than making a doctors appointment and waiting in a doctor’s surgery. The accessibility of mobile technologies makes ‘googling’ symptoms easy, as individuals want real-time information (ABC). But what is this doing to your heart.

DR Google can often provide the worst-case scenarios to patients; giving these patients heightened levels of stress and anxiety. This is not good for your health, and certainly not good for your heart.

Celebrate World Heart Day today by telling a friend to not Google his/her health symptoms. You may save their heart.

Don’t let the web, get to your head!

Stop Dr Google.

Sources:

ABC News 2011, ABC News, accessed 25 August 2015, <http://www.abc.net.au/catalyst/stories/3198312.html>

Starcevic, V., & Berle, D. (2013). Cyberchondria: towards a better understanding of excessive health-related Internet use.

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The Tale of a Cyberchondriac

This is the story of Lorraine Edmiston. A 21-year-old cyberchondriac who believed she was experiencing the symptoms and causes of various serious diseases for months.

Lorraine was experiencing stomach cramps, bloating, nausea, reflux and excessive burping for weeks. With a full-time job and university, she struggled to find time to visit her doctor. Instead, she turned to DR Google for help and advice.

She decided to Google ‘abdominal bloating’ and found 48 possible diseases related to her symptoms on healthline.com. She spent hours reading up on each disease, looked at various websites and sources to narrow down the possible options.

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At the top of the list was indigestion and lactose intolerance – conditions suffered by Lorraine’s mum. Lorraine wasn’t too worried at first, until H. Pylori infection was another suggestion. H. Pylori causes stomach ulcers, another health issue experienced by her mum. At the stage, Lorraine became anxious and began questioning her mum of her experiences and symptoms to see if there were similarities. Many of the symptoms matched up causing stress amongst both Lorraine and her worried mum.

Another suggested cause was gluten intolerance – a condition suffered by Lorraine’s sister. From here, Lorraine chose to go on a gluten free diet to see if this would help. She altered her lifestyle and diet for 2 months. During this time, she didn’t notice her symptoms improving and continued to use DR Google, rather than visit her GP.

During this time, Lorraine discovered one of her friends recently experienced similar health symptoms. Her friend had a hiatal hernia; a condition in which part of the stomach pushes up through the diaphragm muscle causing pain in the abdomen and chest, belching, heartburn, reflux and nausea. Lorraine read up about hiatal hernias on Google and came to the conclusion that she had it!

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At this point, she finally decided to visit her doctor. Her doctor was convinced she was showing symptoms of Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS), however Lorraine was not convinced due to her Google searches. She had convinced herself that it was a more serious issue and demanded tests to be performed. Lorraine underwent X-rays, ultrasounds, a colonoscopy and endoscopy – only to be told her doctor’s initial diagnosis was correct and was suffering from IBS.

Lorraine’s story proves the importance of visiting a doctor when health symptoms arise. She could have prevented stress, panic and changing her diet for 2 months if she didn’t Google her symptoms. Instead of trusting her doctor’s diagnosis, she chose to trust Google – she could have easily avoided hefty medical bills, undergoing anesthetics and spending unnecessary time in waiting rooms.

‘Don’t let the web, get to your head’

Stop Dr Google.